Got cats? Get ‘em fixed free Dec. 5-9

The Animal Shelter Alliance of Portland’s Spay & Save program is working to get EVERY cat altered for free, with a week-long promotion with no limit on the number of cats any one family or person can take in. Clients must live in Clark, Clackamas, Multnomah or Washington counties.

S&S says: “Spaying and neutering makes sense. This life-saving operation reduces the number of unwanted cats or kittens, keeps pets healthy, and reduces roaming. Learn more at spaysave.org

OHS seeks nominations of heroes

Do you know an animal who’s made a difference in the life of a special needs child or someone with an illness? Or a person who’s helped animals in a unique way? The Oregon Humane Society is accepting nominations for its Diamond Collar Hero Awards now through Feb. 1. The awards recognize and honor animals who have acted to save a human or animal life in peril, performed services within the community with undying loyalty, or overcome incredible odds in order to survive. Winners are also humans who have had a positive impact on the lives of animals, exhibiting courage and compassion in the pursuit of animals' wellbeing.

Nominations can be delivered in person or by mail to OHS, or submitted at oregonhumane.org. Winners will be notified in early February, and will be honored at the OHS Heroes Luncheon Feb. 22.

Lane Rescues getting more pets home

Lane Rescues, a Eugene-based group supporting animals at local shelters and rescues by publishing adoptable pets, has teamed with Spot Magazine to distribute a monthly brochure. The beautiful, oversized, full-color brochure features adoptable dogs, cats, horses and more. Businesses and individuals sponsor pets, making the brochures possible. Watch for them everywhere Spot is available in the Willamette Valley, and please share them with those who may be ready to meet the new love of their life! Learn more at lanerescues.org.

Do dogs go to heaven?

A study systematically exploring beliefs about animal afterlife has been published in the journal Anthrozoös. The study investigated how demographic categories can have a considerable influence on beliefs about animal afterlife.

The authors surveyed 800 participants, examining how demographic factors including sex, race, age, geographic region, religious beliefs, and pet ownership all affect an individual's beliefs about animal afterlife.

Results showed that people who believe in an afterlife for humans are more likely to believe in an afterlife for animals — 59% of participants believed in human afterlife and 75% of those individuals also believed in animal afterlife.

Researchers also found that people held different beliefs for different animals. Study leader Kenneth Royal of North Carolina State University said, "In general, dogs, cats, and horses were rated most likely to experience an afterlife, whereas insects, fish, and reptiles were rated least likely."

The findings may have clinical significance for veterinarians in end of life care. Vets should be aware in decision-making and general practice that some people extend their own spirituality to their pets.

Synergy Behavior team, class roster, grows

Synergy Behavior Solutions has added to its team Sara McLoudrey. The announcement describes McLoudrey as a talented animal trainer and teacher with a special love of working with animals with problem behaviors. In addition to working with clients for behavior modification training, McLoudrey has taught unique dog group classes including FitPaws for Reactive Dogs. She is a Certified Nosework instructor, the only Victoria Stillwell certified trainer in Oregon, and a CPDT-KSA.

Synergy offers a variety of individual and group classes, such as k9 nosework, FLEX for reactive dogs, leash handling, massage and more. Learn more at synergybehavior.com.

Veterans receive life-changing gift

Paws of War, a nonprofit that rescues dogs, gives them training, and then pairs them with veterans in need of service dogs, matched two US veterans — Robin Ramos and Derek Logsdon — with working dogs this fall. The service dogs were trained specifically for them, free of charge.

“I’m so excited to . . . be a part of this important mission,” says Lauren Driscoll, dog trainer and program director of the Paws of War Florida chapter. “Our veterans have given so much to us and we know firsthand how trained service dogs help veterans suffering from invisible wounds. Too many of our veterans are struggling as civilians, so we are making it easier for them.”

Both dogs were rescued in February and underwent extensive training. Service dogs can help veterans overcome issues such as PTSD, traumatic brain injury, anxiety, and more.

Stationed in Panama in 1989/’90, Robin suffers from PTSD. He was paired with Colby, a Lab/Catahoula Leopard mix who was trained to retrieve items, turn on lights before Robin enters a room, and more.

Derek also suffers from PTSD, plus hearing loss in both ears, and has attempted suicide twice. His service dog, Carly, is a Lab/Greyhound who’s been trained to retrieve items, assist with his hearing loss (like waking him if a smoke alarm sounds), and more. Derek is a former Army Sergeant deployed to Afghanistan in 2012.

"We are so grateful for our veterans and so happy when we can give back to them,” says Dori Scofield, co-founder of Paws of War. “We have assisted numerous veterans by pairing them with rescued dogs who have been expertly trained. It’s a win-win situation for everyone.”

Learn more at pawsofwar.org.

Ayame

Why, hello! Yes, my name is Ayame, but I prefer to be referred to as the Queen. Sometimes I can be a little clingy and other times I need my space so I’m looking for a person who can go with my flow.

I love to say hello by climbing onto your shoulder and whispering sweet nothings into your ear. I’m kind of a sensitive girl, so I need my own domain. I will happily share my home with humans, but other animals are just not my cup of tea.

I’m a special girl who requires a special diet and litter due to pesky food allergies. If you are looking for someone to dote on, I will be so happy to be your girl!  I've been adoptable for over 6 years now, and just know my special person is out there!

Ayame is at Oregon Coast Humane Society in Florence. To learn more about her or to meet this special girl, call 541-997-4277 or email FAHS3@florencehumane.org.

Cindy Lou

Hey everybody! My name is Cindy Lou and I'm looking for a nice retirement home! I am just the sweetest lady, who enjoys giving kisses, going for walks, and spending time with my people. As you can see, I'm in need of some TLC. Though I'm quite lumpy and bumpy, I still have lots of pep in my step and I'd love to spend my golden years with you! Please come meet me today! I am around 12 years old and weigh 68 pounds. Please come meet me!  I'm at Mulnomah County Animal Services in Troutdale, Multcopets.org.

Rio

HI everyone, my name is Rio!  I am quite the character of a cat, from my freckled nose to my long skinny tail.  I am an adult male approximately 5 years of age with big golden eyes, pale orange fur, long limbs but extremely sensitive skin – so my food needs to be grain-free and my flea control up-to-date every month.

I have a comical but dominant personality and prefer to be the boss!  I’m not really a lap-sitting cat but I love being around my people and watch all their doings. I like to get up high so a cat-size watchtower would be fab in my new domain.  I get along with other cats if they are playful and don’t mind my bossiness.  I also get along well with dogs who know how to play and stay out of my way.  I would probably be fine with older children who could play with me.  I’m just an active boy who needs an active home with lots of play possibilities.

My special adoption fee is just $25, in conjunction with Best Friends Animal Society.  You can come meet me at Wags Dog Emporium in Eugene.  For more info call Beth at (541) 255-9296, West Coast Dog and Cat Rescue, www.westcoastdogandcat.org.

Dazzle

This sweet, cuddly senior can be a bit shy at first, but is quick to warm up and is quite talkative with friends. She loves lounging on couches or laps, getting scratches and pets. Dazzle will do best in a quiet home with no dogs or young children. Dazzle has been in Greenhill’s care for over 520 days and is currently in foster care. To learn more or meet this sweet love, call 541-689-1503 or visit green-hill.org.