Spotlight on...The Dachshund

Matchmaker, Matchmaker

Size:

Grooming needs:  Varies depending on coat type

Exercise:  Requires regular walks & play

Environment:  Indoors with outdoor adventures

Temperament:  Lively, independent

Life Expectancy:  14-17 years

Interesting fact:  Long-bodied, short-legged dogs were depicted in murals in ancient Egyptian tombs, and fossils of dogs resembling Dachshunds have been excavated from the remains of ancient Roman residential sites in Germany.  These murals suggest the existence of Dachshund-like canines in ancient times.*

Appearance:  The Dachshund is a long, low-bodied dog created to crawl into a burrow to hunt badgers.  The name comes from the German word “Dachs,” meaning badger, and “Hund,” meaning dog. Their appearance has earned them the nickname “Weiner Dog.” 

Dachshunds comes in three sizes: miniature, “tweenie,” and standard.  The breed standard for miniature is:  1-11 lbs, 5-6” tall.  Standards run 11-32 lbs, 8-11” tall. Unofficially, “tweenie” varieties — between mini and standard in size are typically 11-16 lbs. As a pet, tweenies appeal to those who want a Doxie that’s not too heavy, and not too fragile. Coat length and type varies, and Dachshunds can be either smooth (short) coated, long- or wire-haired.  Some have bent forelegs like Basset Hounds, and their feet are typically large for their frames. They have a long muzzle and almond shaped eyes. 

Personality:  The Dachshund is among the most popular family pets.  The breed has a cheerful nature, yet is also known to often form a strong bond with one person and act aloof towards others.  This breed has a reputation for being stubborn and mischievous, and can be a challenge to train.  However, with a dedicated guardian they are wonderful companions with excellent temperaments.  Likely due to breeding practices, many breed aficionados note differences in personality between the long-, short- and wirehaired varieties. The suggestion is that smooth and long-haired dogs tend to be quieter and more sensitive than their wire-haired counterparts.

Common Health Problems:  Dachshunds need to be fed correctly to prevent them from becoming obese.  They are prone to intervertebral disk disease (and injury) and vision issues. 

Best Match:  A patient, possibly experienced dog owner is a good fit for a Dachshund. They can be chow hounds (read: beggars) and need someone who gives them plenty of attention.

Depending on the coat, grooming needs vary: for wire-haireds, the coat should be plucked twice weekly; long-haired Doxies should be brushed or combed daily. 

Featured Adoptable:  “Hi, I’m Rocky! I was found as a stray, wandering the streets alone, with no place to rest my head or family to call my own.  I’ll happily share with other dogs, cats, or respectful children age 5+.  And after a day of adventure and a little sparring, I won’t mind bedding down in my crate for a little R&R.  Just like the other Rocky, I’m kindhearted, loyal, and want to knock out loneliness with happiness in a forever family of my own!”

Rocky is 11 months old, 12 lbs, and in care of Family Dogs New Life Shelter, 903-771-5596 or bark@familydogsnewlife.org.


Megan Mahan lives in Eugene with her boyfriend Jacob, their adopted Lab Maddie, many saltwater fish and two miniature Silver Appleyard Ducks, Louie and Olive.