Tips for a safe Halloween

  1. Keep candy out of reach, especially if it contains chocolate or xylitol (common in sugar-free candies and gum);

  2. Make sure your pet has a microchip, collar and ID tag in case of escape;

  3. Keep lit candles/jack-o-lanterns and glow sticks/jewelry out of reach

  4. If putting your pet in costume, make sure it fits properly, is comfortable, doesn't have any pieces easily chewed off, and doesn't interfere with your pet's sight, hearing, breathing, opening its mouth, or moving. Give your pet time to get accustomed to the costume before Halloween, and never leave your him or her unsupervised while in costume;

  5. If your pet is wary of strangers or might bite from stress or fear, put him/her in another room during trick-or-treating hours;

  6. Keep your pet inside. 

Excepted from a public service courtesy of the AVMA.

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Tips For July 4th

Reprinted via Valli Parthasarathy, PhD, DVM, ACVB Resident at Synergy Behavior Solutions

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The fourth of July can be a time of celebration for many people, but it can also be a time of great fear for our pets. Here are some tips to make this Fourth as stress-free as possible for your pets.

Tip #1: Know what your pet's fear looks like.  Fear of fireworks doesn't have to look dramatic. Many very fearful pets will quietly hide or shiver. Others will be more obvious, pacing, panting, vocalizing, or even becoming destructive or pottying in the house. The amount of obvious fear signs don't always correlate with actual fear. A hiding dog may be just as afraid as a panting and pacing dog. They just express that fear differently.

Tip #2: Create a Safe Space. Create a safe area for your pet to be during the fireworks. This can be wherever your pet is most comfortable. Two chairs with a blanket draped over them, a crate, a closet, the basement, or an interior room like a bathroom are some possibilities. Set up the area before fireworks start and do lots of positive things in the area. Feed your pet there, give interactive toys and just generally make it a nice place to be. Make sure that your pet has access to that safe area when the fireworks start.

Think about ways to decrease the sound level of fireworks within the home. Shutting all of the windows tight and running a white noise machine or loud fan can help muffle noises from outside. Mutt Muffs (www.safeandsoundpets.com) and Happy Hoodies (www.happyhoodie.com)  are some options that can help reduce that sound level that your pet hears.

Tip #3: Practice Proactive Safety. In the days leading up to July 4th people are often shooting off fireworks. To keep your pets safe, don't allow your dog off-leash, and make sure that their collar or harness is snug so that they can't slip out of it. Potty your dog on leash before it gets dark on these nights, and again if needed after the fireworks are over. Dogs have even escaped fenced yards in their fear. Don't take your dog out during the fireworks themselves. Keep your cat indoors as well. . In fact, the 5th of July is often one of the busiest days for animal shelters as so many dogs become scared and run away from home during the fireworks.

Consider alternate ways to enrich your pet's environment since they may not be spending as much time outdoors. Some options include food puzzle toys, reward-based trick training or dog daycare if your dog is suitable. Keep in mind that there will probably be occasional fireworks after July 4th, so be prepared for that as well.

Tip #4: Avoiding is OK! Many pet owners leave Portland altogether and spend the July 4th weekend in more remote locations around the state. Other tips that clients have shared with us include: staying at a well sound-insulated hotel (such as near the airport) spending the evening in an underground parking garage, or taking a drive to and from Eugene with their pet to avoid the sounds of the fireworks. Our Fourth of July Hideaway is an option as well!

Tip #5: Medications can bring relief. If your pet is very scared during fireworks, speak to your veterinarian (or for Dr. Valli's clients, speak to her!) now about whether situational anti-anxiety medications are an option to help ease this time for your pet.


Fourth of July Hideway
Are you and your dog staying in town for the July 4th holiday? If your dog does not like fireworks, consider Synergy Behavior Solutions' Fourth of July Hideaway. Bring your dog and hang out for the evening in our quiet space and watch movies to boot!The last two years were a great time and they look forward to it again.

 

Holiday Gift Ideas


Comfort and Joy for the whole family * bimart.com

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2018 CAT Calendar

Give the purrfect gift and support a great cause!  Adorable 12-month wall calendar features photos of rescue cats and kittens * catadoptionteam.org/calendar

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Best Friends' Corner

Holiday Gifts for Pets. 20% off any purchase until Dec. 31 with this ad * oregonhumane.org/services/petsupplies

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Heal Animal Massage Therapy

Providing the highest quality of health and happiness for your furry friend * Healnw.com

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Meat for Cats & Dogs

Dog hoodies are a great gift for every holiday!  Happy Holidays from the Meat family!  * meatforcatsanddogs.com

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Perfect Gift for the Responsible Dog Walker!

Gain freedom from the awkward mess of carrying dog waste - stylish & discreet * porterpockets.com

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Premium Hemp Wellness Products for Pets

Helps reduce inflammation, pain, arthritis, anxiety, and more! Great for older pets. Save 15% of ANY order. Use Coupon Code SPOT15 * PurityPetibles.com

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Give a gift of comfort

RiLEYDAWG - a hugs and smiles comfort pet, is a weighted plush dog made in the USA * rileydawg.com

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Honor a pet or loved one this season!

tinyurl.com/OHS-Tributes

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Beautiful and Clean for the holidays!

Show Dogs Grooming Salon & Boutique Full Service Salon for dogs and cats. Tues-Sat 9am-7pm. We Groom with care. ShowDogsGrooming.com

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7 Ways to Keep Your Pets Happy & Healthy for the Holidays

The holidays are about sharing joy with our loved ones. For many, this includes family pets. Just as we want to keep our children safe, we also need to make sure that our pets stay safe during the holidays.

Pet lover Lori Pace - Coupons.com has compiled a list of her top 7 valuable pet safety tips for the holiday season.

1. Watch those baked treats.

We all love to bake during the holidays, even for dogs, and if your kitchen is like mine, everything from chocolate chips to caramel bits and more can be sitting out on the counter.

Making sure these ingredients are up away from your pet’s nose and mouth is imperative. We all know chocolate is bad for pets, but any over consumption of human food can be a very bad thing.

Make sure all your food and the things that make it are put safely away when you’re not there to supervise!

2. Beware the Christmas tree.

My dogs have never messed with my tree, but I know plenty who have. Cats, especially, love the sparkle of the ornaments, twinkle of the lights, and chance to test their climbing skills.

But it’s not safe for our furry friends to get into the tree and all the decorations on it. Besides accidentally eating tinsel or breaking glass ornaments, a curious cat or playful puppy could accidentally pull your entire tree down on top of themselves!

Try setting up your tree in a room where you can close the door — or, if that’s not an option, set up a baby gate or play yard fence around the base of the tree and keep a close eye on your pets!

3. Cover the fireplace.

Your pet knows there’s no better place to warm up than the hearth in front of your fireplace. But little furry friends may not know their fur is getting a little too close to those open flames!

Make sure they’re protected (and any small children, too!) with a stylish fireplace screen.

4. Protect their paws.

I’ve been in the snow with bare feet (don’t ask!) and it’s cold. I’ve also tromped through snow in thin boots, and that’s cold, too!

Dogs and cats have the same problem when ice and snow cover the ground. Take the time to protect their paws with little booties. They may resist at first, but protecting their paws is a must!

If your pup is new to the idea of shoes, check out this helpful guide to get your dog used to booties.

5. Give them a warm place to rest.

Whether your pet has a door to go in and out freely or is inside all day, a warm and comfy bed is always needed. With all the excitement of the holidays, pets need a good nap just like we do.

I replace my dog’s beds almost annually due to wear and tear and a loss of support. I find great beds everywhere, but I especially love the lined ones with sides and a back for winter. Pets love to curl up in them, even kitties, so give them a cozy, warm place to do just that!

6. Wrap them up.

My dogs love their beds, but those beds may not be enough when it’s below zero outside. When it’s really cold, I like to cover my dogs with cozy pet blankets.

Cats will also like snuggling in a soft blanket, and some may even curl up for a nap underneath it. If so, make sure your kitty isn’t hiding under their blanket in a spot where someone may actually sit or step on them!

7. Bring them inside.

I can’t stress enough the importance of letting your pets come inside your warm, heated house when it’s cold outside.

It’s just plain cruel to leave an animal out in the cold when you yourself would never be out there! Yes, they have fur coats, but even those don’t protect against intense cold, wind, and sleet. The number one thing you can do to keep them safe and warm this holiday is to bring them inside!

Advice for Lost and Found Pets During the July 4th Holiday Period

The July 4th holiday is the number one time of year for pets to go missing. This year, animal advocates worry that it may be a record year because the 4th is at the end of a long weekend. “We are afraid that people will start partying and exploding fireworks on Friday night and not stop until Monday night,” says Deborah Wood, manager of Animals Services for Washington County and the Bonnie Hays Animal Shelter. 

The Bonnie Hays Animal Shelter in Hillsboro will be open on Sunday and Monday for people to bring in “found” pets from Washington County and for people to pick up their lost pets. 

Here is advice for people who have lost a pet – and for people who might find them: 

Lost a pet? 

**Check with your local county animal shelter – those are the organizations that take in stray animals. In Washington County, that is the Bonnie Hays Small Animal Shelter. “Every stray animal in our shelter is on our web site within an hour,” says Wood. To see lost pets, go to www.WashingtonCountyPets.com  and click on “Lost and Found” then “View Lost Pets.” Other local county shelters have similar information about lost pets in their shelters at their web sites. 

**Also check shelters throughout the metropolitan area. “Sometimes animals that started out miles away end up being found in our County – and animals who live in Washington County find their way to other communities,” says Wood. 

**Scour your neighborhood as soon as you know your pet is missing. “Ask your neighbor if they’ve seen your dog or cat. Children often know everything that’s going on, and may know exactly where your lost pet is hanging out,” says Wood. Make flyers with your pet’s photo and your phone number on them. Put them up in the neighborhood and go door-to-door in the area the pet was last seen. Also check with your local pet-related businesses, such as veterinarians, pet supply companies, and other local places where people might take a pet. 

**Make it inviting for your pet to return home. Immediately put out tasty treats, water and your pet’s bed or an item with your smell on it. Your pet may return once it calms down, especially if it senses a piece of home. 

Found a pet? 

If you find a stray dog or cat, assume that it is someone’s beloved pet that has accidentally gotten away and not a “dumped” or neglected animal. A few easy steps can help reunite people and their pets: 

**Bring the pet to your local county shelter, or call and make a found pet report. In Washington County, that’s the Bonnie Hays Shelter in Hillsboro. “This is the place that people come to find their lost pets. It’s the best bet for reuniting an animal with its owner,” says Wood. Shelter staff can scan pets for microchips and they actively look for owners. 

**If a dog has a Washington County license, you can look up the owner on your home computer. Just go towww.WashingtonCountyPets.com, click on “Lost and Found” and click on “License Look-Up.” When you type in the dog’s license number, you’ll get the phone number of the owner. Multnomah County has a similar service. This can save you (and the dog) a trip to the shelter. 

**Talk to your neighbors. Kids are especially likely to know where a lost pet lives. You can also put up a “Found Pet” sign in your own front yard, where an owner might see it if they are out searching. 

The Bonnie L. Hays Small Animal Shelter will be open on July 3rd and 4th to intake stray animals and reunite lost pets with their owners! Hours will be 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM. 

The Bonnie L. Hays shelter is located at 1901 SE 24th Avenue in Hillsboro. It’s just off the Tualatin Valley Highway by Lowe’s and Home Depot. Phone: 503-846-7041.

Helpful web sites: 

Washington County Animal Services: www.WashingtonCountyPets.com

Multnomah County Animal Services: www.multcopets.org

Clackamas County Dog Services: www.clackamas.us/dogs

Tips for Safety and Sanity On the 4th of July

Crazy things can happen around Independence Day, and stories of lost pets on the 4th are legion. Typically it's tales of dogs or cats who busted out of fenced yards or window screens, or even chewed through doors or crates in a manic attempt to escape the cacophony of terrifying noise.

My most memorable experience was a little different.

Early July 2013, I heard strange sounds in the middle of the night. I awoke the next day to find my car scratched and my utility trailer toppled. When it happened again the next night I went to investigate and ran smack into a Jersey bull in my driveway. While I do live in a rural area, I was not aware of a local resident bull. Turned out this 1500-pound neighbor had been wandering the neighborhood for days. He’d even made the news and some believed that 4th of July fireworks had spooked him, causing him to charge through his enclosure. This tale had a happy ending — neighbors and I were able to safely corral him, and the animal was reunited with his family.

Many summer escape artists aren’t so lucky. According to PetFinder.com, more pets are lost on the 4th than any other day of the year, making July 5th one of the busiest days for shelters nationwide.

A little prep can go a long way in ensuring 4th festivities are safe, fun, and sane for everyone in the family.

“My number-one tip this time of year is to be considerate and collaborate with neighbors,” says Amy Linder, Deputy Fire Marshal in Eugene.. If you’re hosting festivities, she says, “Have the courtesy to have a respectful conversation and let them know your plans and timeframe so they can plan accordingly to pre-medicate or go elsewhere.” Of course, if you’re not having a party, your neighbors might be, so again, engage in conversation so that you, too, can plan.

Of course festivities often begin before the 4th – with parties leading up to the holiday, including fireworks and noisemakers. 

Comfort for the fearful

  • Talk to your vet about tranquilizers. Not all meds affect every pet the same way — Valium works great for some, for example, but causes anxiety in others. If possible, try meds ahead for the best chance at finding something that works well for your lovebug.
  • Thundershirts work wonders for some. These “jackets” apply gentle pressure to calm anxiety, fear, and overexcitement.
  • Natural remedies — also worth discussing with your vet, or neighborhood pet supply, who are often very knowledgeable. Rescue Remedy among the most popular treatments; its five flower essences soothe panic, impatience, shock, and anxiety.
  • Tellington Touch – or TTouch therapy – is also known to alleviate anxiety. 

Check the perimeter

  • Make sure they’re secure: rooms, windows, doors, fences and gates. Signs on same can help by reminding you and guests to be vigilant about keeping pets safely inside. 

Set them up for a good day

  • Exercise your pet early in the day, when it’s cooler, fireworks should be minimal or not yet going, and to encourage restful sleep during the festivities.
  • Keep pets indoors, ideally in an interior, escape-proof room. If crate trained, a blanket-covered crate can provide a cozy nest within the safe room. 
  • Give them something to do. Jenn Fiendish, Vet Tech and Specialist in Behavior with Animal Behavior Clinic in Portland says this can help during festivities. “Provide favorite toys, feeder toys filled with a meal, etc.”
  • Minimize stimuli by blocking sights and sounds.  Draw the drapes/shades, run a fan, and/or play soft, soothing music or white noise. Fiendish says keep in mind, some radio and TV stations broadcast programs or ads featuring booming, patriotic sounds throughout the day. 

Get them in uniform

  • Make sure your pet has ID, a current microchip, tattoo, etc.
  • Write or stitch your number inside your pet’s collar or clothing.  

Clean up holiday hazards  

When the party’s over, check your home and yard for debris before letting your pet out, including:  

  • sparklers and fireworks
  • matches, charcoal, lighter fluid
  • kabob skewers
  • citronella candles, tiki torches
  • alcohol and foods (keep pet-specific treats on hand for those who want to pamper your pet)
  • sunscreen, insect repellent, and toys not designed specifically for pets 

If your pet becomes lost 

  • Check local shelters (see list below).
  • Post ads on craigslist, Facebook, and Nextdoor.com.
  • Create a flyer. Search “Lost Pet Flyer” online for easy, printable templates, and be sure to include multiple, current photos of your pet from different angles, showing any identifying marks. A shot with you can demonstrate ownership later if needed. Distribute flyers in your area and through social media. 

Plan ahead

If your otherwise carefree critter suffers from severe pet noise phobia, Fiendish suggests planning ahead for next year. She says counter-conditioning and desensitization programs can be successful, but often take months. Still, she says, it can be worth it. “I’ve seen dogs that ripped skin off their legs in mindless terror on the 4th who, with desensitization conditioning, came to respond to the first fireworks of the year by wagging their tails knowing all was well and a yummy treat was coming.”

Animal Aid, Inc.  *  503-292-6628

Cat Adoption Team  *  503-925-8903

Clackamas County Dog Services  *  503-655-8628

Clark County Animal Protection & Control  *  360-397-2488

Columbia County Animal Control  *  503-397-3935

Columbia County Humane Society  *  503-397-4353

Greenhill Humane Society*  541-844-1777

Homeward Bound Pets  *  503-472-0341

Humane Society for SW Washington  *  360-693-4746

Humane Society of Central Oregon  *  541-382-3537

Indigo Rescue  *  503-626-7222

Marion County Dog Control Services  *  503-566-6966

Multnomah County Animal Services  *  503-988-7387

Newberg Animal Shelter  *  503-554-9285

Oregon Humane Society  *  503-285-7722

Yamhill County Dog Control  *  503-434-7538

Washington County - Bonnie L. Hays Small Animal Shelter  *  503-846-7041

Willamette Humane Society *  503-585-5900


A pet mom and surrogate livestock handler for neighbors, Jo Becker is passionate about disaster planning for the entire family, including our nonhuman friends. Learn more about Jo at JoBecker.weebly.com/animals-in-disasters.html.

‘Tis the season . . .

To open our hearts . . . reach out our hands . . . and GIVE

Following is a sampling of fundraisers, giving trees and holiday drives hosted by generous local businesses in support of some wonderful animal welfare groups. This is far from all-inclusive; rather, it is a sampling to help celebrate the season by highlighting the fact that helping hands and hearts are working throughout the region in support of the animals. 

Please lend your heart and hands! If there is a business or organization you would like to see included next year (or this year online), please let us know! Contact info@spotmagazine.net.


The Pongo Fund Pet Food Bank and Cat Adoption Team ✽ Holiday Drive / Giving Tree
At Meat for cats and dogs, 2244 E Burnside St now through Jan. 1 during open hours.
Notes: Get select dry dog and cat food at discounted prices to make it easy to donate to CAT and/or The Pongo Fund


Oregon Dog Rescue ✽ Holiday Giving Tree
At Oregon Dog Rescue, 6700 SW Nyberg St in Tualatin Dec. 1-31
WISH LIST:
• Nylabones
• Frontline Plus
• Bleach
• 4-ft Leashes
• Dog Beds


Newberg Animal Shelter ✽ Bowlful of Love
At Salty’s Pet Supply, 4039 N Mississippi Ave #104 in Portland; and Fang & Feather, 1926 N. Kilpatrick in Portland, Nov. 25 - Dec. 20 during open hours
NOTES: This food drive helps shelter animals and also will help build up a food bank to help low-income families feed their pets
WISH LIST: Wet and dry pet food, cat litter, treats, blankets and towels


Humane Society for SW Washington ✽ Holiday Giving Drive
At Woodin’ You Pampered Paws, 800 NE Tenney Rd, #112 in Vancouver throughout Dec. during open hours
NOTES: Your donation provides food, treats, shelter and medical care for the more than 8,000 animals HSSW cares for every year


Humane Society for SW Washington ✽ Holiday Giving Drive
At Natural Pet NW, 212 NE 164th Ave #8 in Vancouver Dec. 1-31 during open hours
NOTES: Provides food, treats, shelter and medical care for the animals at HSSW


Bonnie Hays Animal Shelter ✽ 6th Annual Pet Pictures with Santa
At Frontier Veterinary Hospital, 4500 NE Cornell Rd in Hillsboro
Saturday Dec. 12, 1-3pm
NOTES: $10 minimum donation; 100% supports the shelter. Call for reservations 503-648-1643 or walk-in; Frontier happily includes children in
photos, but asks families to please remember this is a pet-centered event


Bonnie Hays Animal Shelter ✽ 4th Annual Pet Food Drive
At Frontier Veterinary Hospital, 4500 NE Cornell Rd in Hillsboro throughout Nov. & Dec.
NOTES: High-quality food is strongly requested — many pets who arrive at the shelter are not in their best health. High-quality food helps
get these pets healthy and ready for adoption more quickly!
WISH LIST:
• Canned or dry adult cat and dog foods; Puppy- and kittenspecific
formulas
• Pet store gift cards for items for animals with special needs
• See the shelter’s complete wish list:
http://www.co.washington.or.us/HHS/AnimalServices/
Donations/wishlist.cfm
• Lean Treats — Butler is matching each bag purchased and donated at Frontier
• Hill’s Science Diet is matching pound-for-pound donated bags of Sensitive Skin and Stomach purchased at Frontier.
Special prices make it easy to donate


Family Dogs New Life ✽ Giving Tree
At Pets on Broadway, 2762 NE Broadway in Portland throughout Dec.
NOTE: Ornaments are marked with specific needs


Drive for Mr. B (at St. Martin's Rescue) ✽ Holiday Fund Drive for Mr. B
At Natures Acres Boarding Kennel, 18651 SE Foster Rd in Damascus
Nov. 27 – Dec. 31 during open hours
NOTES: Donations can be made toward Mr. B's boarding costs at Nature's Acres so the rescue can continue to find the perfect home for him


St. Martin's Animal Rescue ✽ Holiday Fund Drive
At Bailey's Journey Canine Swim Therapy, 1715 25th St SE in Salem.
Nov. 27 – Dec. 31 during open hours
NOTES: Wish list on site; cash/check donations accepted.
DIRE NEED: a new computer
WISH LIST:

  • Monetary donations for medical fund and supplies
  • paper towels
  • dog beds
  • grain-free canned and dry dog food, and grain-free treats
  • laundry detergent
  • puppy pads
  • Answers raw diet (beef or pork) dog foodand goat's milk (sold at Baileys)
  • Toys!
  • Advantix II
  • Bleach
  • pill pockets: duck and pea allergy formula

Greenhill Humane Society ✽ Holiday Drives / Giving Trees
At Symantec, Oregon Wine Lab, Friendly Street Market, and 5th Street Public Market Nov. 27-Dec. 25 during open hours
WISH LIST: At green-hill.org/wish_list.html


My Way Home Dog Rescue ✽ My Way Home for the Holidays
At VCA SE Portland Veterinary Hospital at SE 139th Ave and SE Stark in Portland Nov. 23 –Jan. 3. The hospital is open 24/7. Monetary donations may be made by phone: 503-255-8139.
WISH LIST: Dog beds, leashes, harnesses, collars, toys, sweaters, and support for veterinary expenses
EVENT: Adoption Event Saturday Dec. 12, 10am-2pm, featuring dogs from My Way Home.
NOTES: My Way Home Dog Rescue specializes in older dogs and dogs with significant medical challenges — a few dollars goes a long way in providing veterinary care to dogs who need it!
 


My Way Home Dog Rescue and Animal Aid ✽ Jake ‘n Max’s Boxes of Love
At various Portland-area locations Jan. 14 – Feb. 14
NOTES: Collecting new and gently-used items for local senior animals
WISH LIST: Cozy beds, blankets, toys, bowls, ramps, carts, heating pads, and supplements
Boxes of Love culminates with a Senior Pet Adoption event at the Portland Building.

Complete location and event details coming soon.  Go to Spot Magazine on Facebook.

Holiday Smiles!

Spot recently asked friends to send photos of their little elves, naughty or nice.  Enjoy the magic of the season!

This is Bentley, he is a two year old Great Dane. He loves himself some ugly Christmas sweaters!  ~ Blair Roby

This is Bentley, he is a two year old Great Dane. He loves himself some ugly Christmas sweaters!  ~Blair Roby

This is Otis Medley, enjoying the wrap party. ~ Pam Medley

This is Otis Medley, enjoying the wrap party. ~Pam Medley

Ruger’s Holiday Photo  ~- Mallary

Ruger’s Holiday Photo  ~-Mallary

Photo from our Labradors Buddy (yellow) and Bear (black) at Christmas!  ~  Carol Otis

Photo from our Labradors Buddy (yellow) and Bear (black) at Christmas!  ~Carol Otis

Here are my fur babies on Santa’s lap back in 2011. Asparagus (‘Gus for short) is the dark one, and Bailey is the brindle.  ‘Gus was about one and Bailey was ten in this picture. Both are rescue babies. Bailey is no longer with us; she crossed the bridge two years ago, but ‘Gus is still going strong.   ~ Christina Mays

Here are my fur babies on Santa’s lap back in 2011. Asparagus (‘Gus for short) is the dark one, and Bailey is the brindle.  ‘Gus was about one and Bailey was ten in this picture. Both are rescue babies. Bailey is no longer with us; she crossed the bridge two years ago, but ‘Gus is still going strong.   ~Christina Mays

Max and Chloe with dogmom Jayne and Santa   ~ Jayne Bailey

Max and Chloe with dogmom Jayne and Santa   ~Jayne Bailey

T-bone's first Chanukah! Here you see T-bone (Am Staff) and Jasmine celebrating the 5th night of Chanukah. After lighting the candles, they get to open their presents, yay! These beautiful pups live with Enid and David Traisman.

T-bone's first Chanukah!
Here you see T-bone (Am Staff) and Jasmine celebrating the 5th night of Chanukah. After lighting the candles, they get to open their presents, yay! These beautiful pups live with Enid and David Traisman.

Teko the Wonder Dog in Holiday Attire - Teko the wonder dog and true wonderful friend. From Best Friends of Baker City Rescue. Teko is a Chihuahua mix about 10 years old.   ~ Dana Robinso 

Teko the Wonder Dog in Holiday Attire - Teko the wonder dog and true wonderful friend. From Best Friends of Baker City Rescue. Teko is a Chihuahua mix about 10 years old.   ~Dana Robinso 

Manny the handsome man.  12 years old, from Eastern Oregon rescue Best Friends of Baker City.  My best buddy and constant companion. True love.  ~ Dana Robinso  

Manny the handsome man.  12 years old, from Eastern Oregon rescue Best Friends of Baker City.  My best buddy and constant companion. True love.  ~Dana Robinso 

This is Sassparilla at our annual holiday Doodle Romp. Give her a ball and you can dress her up any way you please!  ~  MatchMeNow1

This is Sassparilla at our annual holiday Doodle Romp. Give her a ball and you can dress her up any way you please!  ~ MatchMeNow1

This is from two years ago of my two Danes and little mix guy. We were trying on our sweaters for our annual visit to see Santa. The dogs, from left to right: Marlie (black spots) middle Jake and Fynn (brown spots).  ~ Jenny McKibben

This is from two years ago of my two Danes and little mix guy. We were trying on our sweaters for our annual visit to see Santa. The dogs, from left to right: Marlie (black spots) middle Jake and Fynn (brown spots).  ~Jenny McKibben

Lexi is my 3-year-old Golden Retriever. Lexi loves playing in the snow over the holiday season. This photo is from Culver, Oregon, where we were visiting friends. We woke up to find fresh snow had fallen, and Lexi ran around like a wild child and even put her nose right in the snow! (you can see her white muzzle in the photo).  ~ Christa Glasgow

Lexi is my 3-year-old Golden Retriever. Lexi loves playing in the snow over the holiday season. This photo is from Culver, Oregon, where we were visiting friends. We woke up to find fresh snow had fallen, and Lexi ran around like a wild child and even put her nose right in the snow! (you can see her white muzzle in the photo).  ~Christa Glasgow

Boo Radley ate Santa!!! He will be 8 next Saturday! He has Addison’s disease, for which he takes daily meds and a monthly shot. He is the love of my life! He really is my real life Boo Radley; he has saved me many times over, and I never had to wear a ham costume for him to do it!! ~ Julie

Boo Radley ate Santa!!! He will be 8 next Saturday! He has Addison’s disease, for
which he takes daily meds and a monthly shot. He is the love of my life! He really
is my real life Boo Radley; he has saved me many times over, and I never had to wear
a ham costume for him to do it!! ~Julie

Brie, 7 years old, named after the cheese!! She is a true rescue story, as is her sister, Periwinkle. ~ Juli

Brie, 7 years old, named after the cheese!! She is a true rescue story, as is her sister, Periwinkle. ~Juli

Periwinkle Blue is 5 years old.  ~ Cindy Wiseman Buchanan

Periwinkle Blue is 5 years old.  ~Cindy Wiseman Buchanan

Doggie Christmas - Attached is a picture of my two little furries, Paige (b/w) and Karmin (apricot) visiting with Santa.  Paige apparently really wanted something great from Santa and gave him a kiss to seal the deal  ~ Rita Sickler

Doggie Christmas - Attached is a picture of my two little furries, Paige (b/w) and Karmin (apricot) visiting with Santa.  Paige apparently really wanted something great from Santa and gave him a kiss to seal the deal  ~Rita Sickler

KT Bug

KT Bug

This is KT (bug), she is 9 years old. She has been with us since she was 6 weeks old. She has always had someone with her. She never got into things, chewed on things that did not belong to her. We can put a toy out, tell her it's not hers and she will leave it alone. Till her later age. She has got into garbage. Testing the limits (in old age), however she is such a love. Loves to have people touch her. She would make a wonderful therapy dog.  ~ Misty Wagner

This is KT (bug), she is 9 years old. She has been with us since she was 6 weeks old. She has always had someone with her. She never got into things, chewed on things that did not belong to her. We can put a toy out, tell her it's not hers and she will leave it alone. Till her later age. She has got into garbage. Testing the limits (in old age), however she is such a love. Loves to have people touch her. She would make a wonderful therapy dog.  ~Misty Wagner

Lily, Lucy, Chase, Brynn & Kohala are waiting patiently to play those reindeer games!  ~ Lori Rose   

Lily, Lucy, Chase, Brynn & Kohala are waiting patiently to play those reindeer games!  ~Lori Rose   

Sweety Whippet-Mix loves being a reindeer. She likes her ears to be warm.  ~ Lori Rose

Sweety Whippet-Mix loves being a reindeer. She likes her ears to be warm.  ~Lori Rose

4th of July - Keeping them safe through the “storm”

Some pets truly suffer through fireworks or thunderstorms. Spot asked for tips from local experts, and most agree on prevailing tips and remedies. Sarah Fuller of NoPo Paws and the folks at Multnomah County Animal Services nicely summed up prevailing wisdom on keeping fearful pets safe and comfortable through the fireworks and thunderstorms they dread.

Fighting the Fear

From Sarah Fuller, NoPo Paws

We encourage pet parents to start thinking about the 4th in June so they may be prepared by the time we start hearing fireworks in early July. I encourage folks to set up a quiet, calm area at where the noise of the fireworks will be less impactful to a pet.  We use our finished basement for this. Play either the radio, TV or some white noise to further help muffle fireworks sounds.  I recommend preparing a frozen Kong or purchasing a long-lasting, high-value chew like a raw bone, and giving it to your dog right before fireworks begin.

These are great tips for all dogs, regardless of how frightened they are by the loud noises. However, if a pet experiences more severe anxiety, we recommend one or a combination of the following: Thundershirt, herbal calming remedies, like Animal Apawthecary’s Tranquility Blend, or calming treats. These products should be tested well ahead of the 4th to gauge your pet’s response; they are also available in cat varieties.

Not all pets react the same to calming products, and by testing them you can see how they work for your pet and adjust as needed to provide the greatest relief. Additionally, never assume your pet’s reaction will be the same from year to year. In our household, one dog has gotten more relaxed year to year (with the use of Tranquility Blend) while another dog has gotten worse and now requires both the Tranquility Blend and the Thundershirt.

My final recommendation is to utilize the fireworks in the days leading up to the 4th as a training opportunity to desensitize your pet to the bangs and explosions. Carry a treat pouch at home, and every time you hear an occasional firework, reward your pet’s calm behavior with a treat. With consistency, your pet might even change his or her mind about the fireworks and begin to look forward to each bang because they know it predicts a yummy treat!

What to do if you lose — or find a lost — pet

From Multnomah County Animal Services –

Each year, MCAS experiences are large influx of lost animals around the 4th. When pets hear the explosions, some startle and bolt. Unfortunately, some are even injured by fences and cars as they attempt to flee.

If you lose or find a pet, please visit MultCoPets.org. As the primary stray holding facility for Multnomah County residents, we offer detailed lost and found information.

If you lose a pet, check the shelter and submitted reports early and often. MCAS is offering a "Reunited We Stand" special through July 12th. All licensed pets that find their way to the MCAS shelter during this time can be redeemed at no cost.

If you've found a pet in Multnomah County wearing a license tag, you can look up owner contact information on the MCAS License Lookup page. If no license tag and you don't find the owner after searching the lost reports, you are required by law to report the found animal at MultCoPets.org. You may care for the animal yourself until the owner is located or take it to the shelter during regular business hours. For complete instructions, click on the “Found a Pet?” tab.